The Astronautica Book Club

Space Books for the Discerning Reader

  • Shop
  • Haynes Manual: Mercury Spacecraft

Haynes Manual: Mercury Spacecraft

22.99
Mercury Cover.png

Haynes Manual: Mercury Spacecraft

22.99

DAVID BAKER

With full access to NASA’s libraries, and drawing on his experience of working on the subsequent Gemini and Apollo programmes, David Baker gets under the skin of Mercury – the spacecraft famously described by its occupants as ‘spam in a can’, but which in many ways was the unsung hero of space exploration. Aided by a wealth of diagrams, technical drawings, and archive photographs, he describes the myriad systems and subsystems that made up the tiny capsule, many of which had to be developed from scratch and have never before been covered in such detail. As David himself says: Mercury was small and relatively basic, but its influence was mighty. Had it not been for Mercury’s engineering feats, the Gemini and Apollo programmes would never have existed, and the space race would have taken on a wholly different complexion.’

Format: hardback, 270 x 215 x 17 mm

More Info

Add To Cart

DAVID BAKER

With full access to NASA’s libraries, and drawing on his experience of working on the subsequent Gemini and Apollo programmes, David Baker gets under the skin of Mercury – the spacecraft famously described by its occupants as ‘spam in a can’, but which in many ways was the unsung hero of space exploration. Aided by a wealth of diagrams, technical drawings, and archive photographs, he describes the myriad systems and subsystems that made up the tiny capsule, many of which had to be developed from scratch and have never before been covered in such detail. As David himself says: Mercury was small and relatively basic, but its influence was mighty. Had it not been for Mercury’s engineering feats, the Gemini and Apollo programmes would never have existed, and the space race would have taken on a wholly different complexion.’

Format: hardback, 270 x 215 x 17 mm

About the author

Author Dr David Baker worked with NASA on the Gemini, Apollo and Shuttle programmes between 1965 and 1990. He has written more than 100 books on space flight and military technology and is the former editor of Jane’s Space Directory and Jane’s Aircraft Upgrades. In 1986 he was made a member of the International Academy of Astronautics by NASA manned flight boss George Mueller and is a member of the US Air Force Association and The Association of Former Intelligence Officers. He received the 1998 Rolls-Royce Award for Aerospace Journalist of the Year and in 2005 he was a recipient of the Arthur C Clarke Award. David is currently the editor of SpaceFlight, the monthly space news magazine of the British Interplanetary Society, of which he is a Fellow. He lives in East Sussex, England, with his wife Ann.