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Haynes Manual: Nuclear Weapons

22.99
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Haynes Manual: Nuclear Weapons

22.99

DAVID BAKER

During the deep chill of the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union accumulated more than 60,000 nuclear weapons – most with far greater destructive power than the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Today, thankfully, there are far fewer ‘nukes’ in circulation. But other countries have since aspired to join the “nuclear club”, potentially upsetting the delicate balance of what has come to be known as MAD – Mutually Assured Destruction. This Manual serves as a comprehensive layman’s reference to the various types of nuclear weapon, to the nuclear tests conducted since 1945, and to the surprisingly wide range of applications to which these weapons have been put. It concludes with an examination of their terrifying effects, and a realistic appraisal of how their use can be contained.

Format: hardback, 270 x 215 x 17 mm

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DAVID BAKER

During the deep chill of the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union accumulated more than 60,000 nuclear weapons – most with far greater destructive power than the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Today, thankfully, there are far fewer ‘nukes’ in circulation. But other countries have since aspired to join the “nuclear club”, potentially upsetting the delicate balance of what has come to be known as MAD – Mutually Assured Destruction. This Manual serves as a comprehensive layman’s reference to the various types of nuclear weapon, to the nuclear tests conducted since 1945, and to the surprisingly wide range of applications to which these weapons have been put. It concludes with an examination of their terrifying effects, and a realistic appraisal of how their use can be contained.

Format: hardback, 270 x 215 x 17 mm

About the author

Author Dr David Baker worked with NASA on the Gemini, Apollo and Shuttle programmes between 1965 and 1990. He has written more than 100 books on space flight and military technology and is the former editor of Jane’s Space Directory and Jane’s Aircraft Upgrades. In 1986 he was made a member of the International Academy of Astronautics by NASA manned flight boss George Mueller and is a member of the US Air Force Association and The Association of Former Intelligence Officers. He received the 1998 Rolls-Royce Award for Aerospace Journalist of the Year and in 2005 he was a recipient of the Arthur C Clarke Award. David is currently the editor of SpaceFlight, the monthly space news magazine of the British Interplanetary Society, of which he is a Fellow. He lives in East Sussex, England, with his wife Ann.